Our diverse research efforts in nanomaterials include applications for detecting chemical and biological warfare agents, radiological agents and other hazardous vapour – offering significant benefits to the homeland security sector among others.

Research domains include: 

  • Graphene nanoparticles in sensing systems for chemical or biological agents
  • Metal oxides for detoxification
  • Smart nano coatings for vehicles, aviation industry
  • Nano composite for smart fabrics 

Our research into artificial and synthetic self-healing materials is devoted to develop ability of automatically repair damage without external diagnosis or human intervention.

Research domains include: 

  • Composite structures with self-repair ability
  • Self-healing coatings
  • Self-healing polymers

At AMRC, our work in the field of both engineered and naturally occurring multifunctional materials seeks to expand the universe of such materials and broaden their use cases.  

Research domains include: 

  • Sensing, actuation and energy transduction
  • Origami structures
  • Morphing structures
  • Controllable and monitorable energy, shock and vibration absorbers
  • Live monitoring and reporting system of structural health

We are researching a new generation of artificial metamaterials with structural properties that extend beyond those of materials found in nature.

Research domains include: 

  • Cloaking materials and stealth
  • Elastic metamaterials that exhibit acoustic invisibility
  • Structural metamaterials that exhibit extreme crushability

    The broad array of uses for energy-absorbing materials makes this a priority research area for AMRC. These lightweight materials and structures are capable of absorbing extreme levels of energy, whether from a localised blast, impact loading or some other force.

    Research domains include: 

    • Hybrid materials based on combinations of dissimilar materials
    • Multifunctional materials and structures
    • Novel sandwich structures
    • Lightweight composite foams and lattice structures

    Additive manufacturing makes it possible to produce intrinsically complex structures with enhanced properties, including many of which were previously impossible to manufacture. New opportunities in the field are continually being identified in aviation, healthcare, power, manufacturing and beyond.

    Research domains include: 

    • Topology-optimised aerospace structures
    • Lattice structures for blast / impact protection
    • MRO of performance-critical turbine components